UNITED STATES

SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

Washington, D.C. 20549

 

Form 10-Q

 

[X] QUARTERLY REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

 

For the quarterly period ended June 30, 2016

 

[  ] TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

 

Commission file number 000-55203

 

 

eWELLNESS HEALTHCARE CORPORATION

(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)

 

Nevada   45-1560906
(State or other jurisdiction of
incorporation or organization)
  (I.R.S. Employer
Identification No.)
     
11825 Major Street, Culver City, California   90230
(Address of principal executive offices)   (Zip Code)

 

(310) 915-9700

(Registrant’s telephone number, including area code)

 

Copies of Communications to:

Louis Taubman, Esq.

Hunter Taubman Fischer

1450 Broadway, 26th Floor

New York, NY 10018

P: 917-512-0828

F: 212-202-6380

 

Indicate by check mark whether the issuer (1) filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days.

Yes [X] No [  ]

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically and posted on its corporate Web site, if any, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit and post such files).

Yes [X] No [  ]

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, or a smaller reporting company. See definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer” and “smaller reporting company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.

 

Large accelerated filer [  ] Accelerated filer [  ]
   
Non-accelerated filer [  ] (Do not check if a smaller reporting company) Smaller reporting company [X]

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act).

Yes [  ] No [X]

 

The number of shares of Common Stock, $0.001 per share par value, outstanding on August 15, 2016 was 19,675,728.

 

 

 
 

 

TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

PART I - FINANCIAL INFORMATION  
Item 1 Financial Statements F-1
Item 2. Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations 3
Item 3 Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk 10
Item 4 Controls and Procedures 10
PART II - OTHER INFORMATION  
Item 1 Unregistered Sales of Equity Securities and Use of Proceeds 11
Item 2 Exhibits 11
Signatures 12


 

  2  
 

 

PART I - FINANCIAL INFORMATION

 

ITEM 1. FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

 

eWELLNESS HEALTHCARE CORPORATION

CONDENSED BALANCE SHEETS

 

      June 30, 2016       December 31, 2015  
      (unaudited)          
                 
ASSETS                
                 
CURRENT ASSETS                
Cash   $ 12,249     $ 41,951  
Prepaid Expenses     1,616,202       4,053  
                 
Total current assets     2,027,262       46,004  
                 
Property & equipment, net     5,122       5,964  
Intangible assets, net     18,385       19,862  
                 
TOTAL ASSETS   $ 1,651,958     $ 71,830  
                 
LIABILITIES AND STOCKHOLDERS’ DEFICIT                
                 
CURRENT LIABILITIES                
Accounts payable and accrued expenses   $ 372,546     $ 248,304  
Accounts payable - related party     49,702       43,717  
Accrued expenses - related party     94,379       33,090  
Accrued compensation     850,408       677,000  
Contingent liability     90,000       90,000  
Convertible debt, net of discount     180,419       309,945  
Derivative liability     782,944       2,802  
Short term note and liabilities     103,673       71,605  
                 
Total current liabilities     2,524,071       1,476,463  
                 
Total Liabilities     2,524,071       1,476,463  
                 
STOCKHOLDERS’ DEFICIT                
Preferred stock, authorized, 10,000,000 shares, $.001 par value, 0 shares issued and outstanding     -       -  
Common stock, authorized 100,000,000 shares, $.001 par value, 19,377,770 and 18,170,538 issued and outstanding, respectively     19,378       18,171  
Additional paid in capital     4,917,728       2,033,383  
Accumulated deficit     (5,809,219 )     (3,456,187 )
                 
Total Stockholders’ Deficit     (872,113 )     (1,404,633 )
                 
TOTAL LIABILITIES AND STOCKHOLDERS’ DEFICIT   $ 1,651,958     $ 71,830  

 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these consolidated financial statements

 

  F-1  
 

 

eWELLNESS HEALTHCARE CORPORATION

CONDENSED STATEMENTS OF OPERATIONS

For the Three and Six Months ended June 30, 2016 and 2015

(unaudited)

 

    Three Months Ended     Six Months Ended  
    June 30, 2016     June 30, 2015     June 30, 2016     June 30, 2015  
                         
OPERATING EXPENSES                                
Executive compensation     181,367       186,000       372,000       372,000  
General and administrative     63,643       62,284       115,169       96,872  
Professional fees     727,543       149,668       838,831       240,062  
                                 
Total Operating Expenses     972,553       397,952       1,326,000       708,934  
                                 
Loss from Operations     (972,553 )     (397,952 )     (1,326,000 )     (708,934 )
                                 
OTHER INCOME (EXPENSE)                                
Gain on extinguishment of debt     -       -       -       11,323  
Loss on derivative liability     (505,142 )     -       (505,142 )     -  
Interest expense, related parties     (1,032 )     (879 )     (1,929 )     (1,957 )
Interest expense     (448,697 )     (35,249 )     (519,961 )     (21,391 )
                                 
Net Loss before Income Taxes     (1,927,424 )     (434,080 )     (2,353,032 )     (720,959 )
                                 
Income tax expense     -       -       -       -  
                                 
Net Loss   $ (1,927,424 )   $ (434,080 )   $ (2,353,032 )   $ (720,959 )
                                 
Basic and diluted (loss) per share   $ (0.10 )   $ (0.03 )   $ (0.12 )   $ (0.04 )
                                 
Basic and diluted weighted average shares outstanding     18,671,490       16,881,000       18,986,781       16,811,276  

 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these consolidated financial statements

 

  F-2  
 

 

eWELLNESS HEALTHCARE CORPORATION

CONDENSED STATEMENT OF CASH FLOWS

For the Six Months Ended June 30, 2016 and 2015

(unaudited)

 

    For Six Months Ended  
    June 30, 2016     June 30, 2015  
             
Cash flows from operating activities                
Net loss   $ (2,353,032 )   $ (750,959 )
Adjustments to reconcile net loss to net cash used in operating activities:                
Depreciation and amortization     2,319       2,109  
Contributed services     192,000       195,000  
Shares issued for consulting services     -       24,222  
Imputed interest - related party     1,929       1,956  
Options expense      508,395       -  
Interest on debt extension     62,933       -  
Amortization of debt discount to interest expense     147,650       28,944  
Warrants issued for services     -       22,592  
Warrants issued for debt extension     780,142       -  
Rent contributed by officer     3,000       -  
Changes in operating assets and liabilities             -  
Advances - related parties     -       7,054  
Prepaid expense     127,451       (25,726 )
Accounts payable and accrued expenses     136,829       20,108  
Accounts payable - related party     5,985       (10,820 )
Accrued expenses - related party     61,289       24,351  
Accrued compensation     173,408       174,000  
                 
Net cash used in operating activities     (149,702 )     (287,169 )
                 
Cash flows from investing activities                
Purchase of equipment     -       (4,207 )
Net cash used in investing activities     -       (4,207 )
                 
Cash flows from financing activities                
Proceeds from issuance of common stock     120,000       270,080  
Promissory note     -       25,000  
                 
Net cash provided by financing activities     120,000       295,080  
                 
Net increase (decrease) in cash     (29,702 )     3,704  
                 
Cash, beginning of period     41,951       900  
                 
Cash, end of period   $ 12,249     $ 4,604  
                 
Supplemental Information:                
Cash paid for:                
Taxes   $ -     $ -  
Interest Expense   $ -     $ -  

 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these consolidated financial statements

 

  F-3  
 

 

eWellness Healthcare Corporation

Notes to Condensed Financial Statements

(unaudited)

 

Note 1. The Company

 

The Company and Nature of Business

 

eWellness Healthcare Corporation (f/k/a Dignyte, Inc.), (the “Company”, “we”, “us”, “our”) was incorporated in the State of Nevada on April 7, 2011, to engage in any lawful corporate undertaking, including, but not limited to, selected mergers and acquisitions. The Company has generated no revenues to date. Prior to the Share Exchange Agreement discussed below, other than issuing shares to its original shareholder, the Company never commenced any operational activities.

 

The eWellness strategy as a first-to-market enterprise in the Physical Therapy based telemedicine industry is to deliver a telemedicine physical therapy service augmenting corporate wellness programs and also expand nationally through a Software as a Service (SaaS) business model that enables existing physical therapy practices to extend their offerings via our telemedicine solution. Our objective is to provide Distance Monitored Physical Therapy (PHZIO) Programs to pre diabetic, cardiac and health challenged patients and knee and hip surgery rehabilitation. For corporate wellness program our services are designed to deliver significant healthcare savings to the company while charging a very small relative incremental cost.

 

  F-4  
 

 

eWellness Healthcare Corporation

Notes to Condensed Financial Statements

(unaudited)

 

Note 2. Summary of Significant Accounting Policies

 

Basis of Presentation

 

The interim financial information of the Company as of and for the periods ended June 30, 2016 and June 30, 2015 is unaudited. The balance sheet as of December 31, 2015 is derived from audited financial statements of eWellness Healthcare Corporation. The accompanying financial statements have been prepared in accordance with U.S. generally accepted accounting principles for interim financial statements. Accordingly, they omit or condense footnotes and certain other information normally included in financial statements prepared in accordance with U.S. generally accepted accounting principles. The accounting policies followed for quarterly financial reporting conform to the accounting policies disclosed in ASU 2014-10. In the opinion of management, all adjustments which are necessary for a fair presentation of the financial information for the interim periods reported have been made. All such adjustments are of a normal recurring nature. The results of operations for the three and six months ended June 30, 2016 are not necessarily indicative of the results that can be expected for the entire year ending December 31, 2016. The unaudited financial statements should be read in conjunction with the financial statements and the notes thereto included in the Company’s annual report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2015.

 

Use of Estimates

 

The preparation of financial statements in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities at the date of the financial statements and reported amounts of revenue and expenses during the reporting period. Actual results could differ materially from these good faith estimates and judgments.

 

  F-5  
 

 

eWellness Healthcare Corporation

Notes to Condensed Financial Statements

(unaudited)

 

Going Concern

 

For the period ended June 30, 2016, the Company has no revenues. The Company has an accumulated loss of $5,809,219. In view of these matters, there is substantive doubt about the Company’s ability to continue as a going concern. The Company’s ability to continue operations is dependent upon the Company’s ability to raise additional capital and to ultimately achieve sustainable revenues and profitable operations, of which there can be no guarantee. The Company intends to finance its future development activities and its working capital needs largely from the sale of public equity securities with some additional funding from other traditional financing

 

sources, including term notes, until such time that funds provided by operations are sufficient to fund working capital requirements. The financial statements of the Company do not include any adjustments relating to the recoverability and classification of recorded assets, or the amounts and classifications of liabilities that might be necessary should the Company be unable to continue as a going concern.

 

Fair Value of Financial Instruments

 

As of June 30, 2016, the Company had the following assets and liabilities measured at fair value on a recurring basis.

 

    Total     Level 1     Level 2     Level 3  
Derivative liability   $ 782,944     $ -     $ -     $ 782,944  
Total liabilities measure at fair value   $ 782,944     $ -     $ -     $ 782,944  

 

  F-6  
 

 

eWellness Healthcare Corporation

Notes to Condensed Financial Statements

(unaudited)

 

Loss per Common Share

 

The Company follows ASC Topic 260 to account for the loss per share. Basic loss per common share calculations are determined by dividing net loss by the weighted average number of shares of common stock outstanding during the period. Diluted loss per common share calculations are determined by dividing net loss by the weighted average number of common shares and dilutive common share equivalents outstanding. During periods when common stock equivalents, if any, are anti-dilutive they are not considered in the computation. As the Company has incurred losses for the period ended June 30, 2016, no dilutive shares are added into the loss per share calculations.

 

Recent Accounting Pronouncements

 

From time to time, new accounting pronouncements are issued by the Financial Accounting Standards Board (“FASB”) that are adopted by the Company as of the specified date. The Company has elected to the early adoption of ASU 2015-03 that simplifies the presentation of debt issuance costs. The Company had previously used the methodology in this standard and has adopted the pronouncement for current and future debt instruments.

 

  F-7  
 

 

eWellness Healthcare Corporation

Notes to Condensed Financial Statements

(unaudited)

 

Note 3. Property and Equipment

 

Property and equipment consists of computer equipment that is stated at cost $8,421 and $8,421 less accumulated depreciation of $3,299 and $2,457 at June 30, 2016 and December 31, 2015, respectively. Depreciation expense was $842 for the six months ended June 30, 2016 and $632 for the six months ended June 30, 2015, respectively. Depreciation expense was $421 for the three months ended June 30, 2016 and $632 for the three months ended June 30, 2015.

 

Note 4. Intangible Assets

 

The Company recognizes the cost of a software license and a license for use of a programming code as intangible assets. The stated cost of these assets were $24,770 and $24,770 less accumulated amortization of $6,385 and $4,908 at June 30, 2016 and December 31, 2015, respectively. For the six months ended June 30, 2016 and June 30, 2015, the amortization expense recorded was $1,477 and $1,477, respectively. For the three months ended June 30, 2016 and June 30, 2015, the amortization expense recorded was $739 and $977, respectively.

 

Note 5. Related Party Transactions

 

Through the period ended June 30, 2016, a related party, a company for which the Company’s former Secretary-Treasurer and CFO is also serving as CFO, has paid $101,171 on the Company’s behalf for various operating expenses. The amount outstanding as of June 30, 2016 and December 31, 2015 was $49,702 and $43,717, respectively. The Company recorded $1,929 and $1,956 imputed interest on the amount owed to the related party based on an interest rate of 8% for the six months ended June 30, 2016 and June 30, 2015, respectively.

 

During 2014, the Company entered into a license agreement with a programming company in which one of our directors is Chief Marketing Officer. Through the licensing agreement, we obtained a perpetual license to use the programming code created by a video management platform as a base to develop our telemedicine video service for a license fee of $20,000. The license fee is recorded as an Intangible Asset and Accounts Payable on the Balance Sheet.

 

On April 1, 2015, the Company entered into an operating agreement with a physical therapy company (“EPT”) which is owned by the Company’s President and Chief Executive Officer. Through the agreement the Company agrees to provide operating capital advances in order for EPT to offer the Company’s PHIZIO platform to physical therapy patients. For accounting and tax purposes, the net profits or losses generated by EPT shall be allocated on a monthly basis. The Company will receive 75% of the net patient insurance reimbursements associated with the operation of the PHIZIO platform.

 

The Company rents its Culver City, CA office space from a company owned by our CEO. The imputed rent expense of $500 per month is recorded in the Consolidated Statement of Operations and Additional Paid in Capital in the Balance Sheet.

 

The officers of the Company incur business expenses on behalf of the Company. The amounts outstanding as of June 30, 2016 and December 31, 2015 were $94,379 and $33,090, respectively.

 

Note 6. Income Taxes

 

The tax provision for interim periods is determined using an estimate of the Company’s effective tax rate for the full year adjusted for discrete items, if any, that are taken into account in the relevant period. Each quarter the Company updates its estimate of the annual effective tax rate, and if the estimated tax rate changes, the Company makes a cumulative adjustment.

 

  F-8  
 

 

eWellness Healthcare Corporation

Notes to Condensed Financial Statements

(unaudited)

 

At June 30, 2016 and December 31, 2015, the Company had a full valuation allowance against its deferred tax assets, net of expected reversals of existing deferred tax liabilities, as it believes it is more likely than not that these benefits will not be realized.

 

The Company does not identify any material uncertain tax positions of the Company on returns that have been filed or that will be filed. The Company has not had operations and has deferred items consisting entirely of unused Net Operating Losses. Since the Company does not believe that this Net Operating Loss will ever produce a tax benefit, even if examined by taxing authorities and disallowed entirely, there would be no effect on the financial statements.

 

The Company’s policy is to recognize potential interest and penalties accrued related to unrecognized tax benefits within income tax expense. For the periods ended June 30, 2016, and June 30, 2015, the Company did not recognize nor accrue for any interest or penalties.

 

Note 7. Non-Convertible Notes Payable

 

On March 14, 2016, the Company issued a 45-day promissory note to a shareholder of $112,550 as an extension for notes with a shareholder dated May 30 2015, July 15, 2015, September 16, 2015, October 11, 2015, and December 6, 2015. The amount of the note includes interest accrued on the previous notes, risky loan fee and a default fee. The note has an annual interest rate of 12% due and payable on May 1, 2016. As an inducement for this promissory note, the Company issued 400,000 warrants to purchase Company common stock at $.80 per share. The fair value of the warrants is $794. For the period ended June 30, 2016, the Company recorded $2,503 of interest expense for this note.

 

On May 2, 2016, the Company issued a 40-day promissory note to a shareholder of $131,399 as an extension for notes with a shareholder dated May 30 2015, July 15, 2015, September 16, 2015, October 11, 2015, December 6, 2015 and March 14, 2016. The amount of the note includes interest accrued on the previous notes, risky loan fee and a default fee. The note has an annual interest rate of 12% due and payable on June 10, 2016. As an inducement for this promissory note, the Company issued 400,000 warrants to purchase Company common stock at $.80 per share. The debt discount calculation for the note resulted in the fair value of the warrants being $1,251,078 and $131,399 being allocated to the note. For the period ended June 30, 2016, the Company recorded $1,641 of interest expense for this note and $118,910 for debt discount interest.

 

On June 11, 2016, the Company issued a 30-day promissory note to a shareholder of $152,989 as an extension for notes with a shareholder dated May 30 2015, July 15, 2015, September 16, 2015, October 11, 2015, December 6, 2015, March 14, 2016 and May 2, 2016. The amount of the note includes interest accrued on the previous notes, risky loan fee and a default fee. The note has an annual interest rate of 12% due and payable on July13, 2016. As an inducement for this promissory note, the Company issued 400,000 warrants to purchase Company common stock at $.80 per share. The debt discount calculation for the note resulted in the fair value of the warrants being $587,780 and $152,988 being allocated to the note. For the period ended June 30, 2016, the Company recorded $1,006 of interest expense for this note and $72,077 for debt discount interest. The note was renewed on July 14, 2016 as discussed in Note 12 – Subsequent Events.

 

Note 8. Convertible Notes Payable

 

On February 29, 2016, a convertible promissory note with the principal value of $69,500 was converted to 227,332 shares of common stock at a conversion price of $.35 per share. The warrants associated with this note were not exercised. See Note 9 below – Equity Transactions.

 

  F-9  
 

 

eWellness Healthcare Corporation

Notes to Condensed Financial Statements

(unaudited)

 

On June 20, 2016, the holder of the promissory note dated December 7, 2015, extended the due date from June 10, 2016 to July 11, 2016. The lender additionally agreed to extend the date required to raise additional capital as set forth in the promissory note to July 11, 2016. In exchange for this extension the Company issued 100,000 warrants to purchase Company common stock at a purchase price of $1.00 per share. The fair value of the warrants is $111,792. The extension also stipulated payment of outstanding interest of $12,000 and extension fee of $13,000. These charges were paid on June 10, 2016. On July 12, 2016, the note was extended as discussed in Note. 12 – Subsequent Events.

 

Note 9. Equity Transactions

 

Preferred Stock

 

The total number of shares of preferred stock which the Company shall have authority to issue is 10,000,000 shares with a par value of $0.001 per share. There have been no preferred shares issued as of June 30, 2016.

 

Common Stock

 

The total number of shares of common stock which the Company shall have authority to issue is 100,000,000 shares with a par value of $0.001 per share.

 

Holders of shares of common stock are entitled to cast one vote for each share held at all stockholders’ meetings for all purposes including the election of directors. The common stock does not have cumulative voting rights.

 

No holder of shares of stock of any class is entitled as a matter of right to subscribe for or purchase or receive any part of any new or additional issue of shares of stock of any class or of securities convertible into shares of stock of any class, whether now hereafter authorized or whether issued for money, for consideration other than money, or by way of dividend.

 

On February 29, 2016, the Company authorized the issuance of 227,232 shares for conversion of convertible debt of $69,500.

 

During the six months ended June 30, 2016, the Company issued 860,000 shares of common stock for consulting services. The weighted average price of these shares was $2.023. The value of the shares are being amortized over the life of the contracts that are from six to twelve months.

 

  F-10  
 

 

eWellness Healthcare Corporation

Notes to Condensed Financial Statements

(unaudited)

 

On June 2, 2016, the Company sold 120,000 shares of common stock upon receipt of $120,000 cash.

 

As of the period ended June 30, 2016, the Company has 19,377,770 shares of common stock issued and outstanding.

 

On February 22, 2016, the Company received the common stock trading symbol of EWLL.

 

Stock Options

 

On August 6, 2015, the Board of Directors approved the 2015 Stock Option Plan, pursuant to which certain directors, officers, employees and consultants will be eligible for certain stock options and grants. The Plan is effective as of August 1, 2015 and the maximum number of shares reserved and available for granting awards under the Plan shall be an aggregate of 3,000,000 shares of common stock, provided however that on each January 1, starting with January 1, 2016, an additional number of shares equal to the lesser of (A) 2% of the outstanding number of shares (on a fully-diluted basis) on the immediately preceding December 31 and (B) such lower number of shares as may be determined by the Board or committee charged with administering the plan. This plan may be amended at any time by the Board or appointed plan Committee.

 

On February 19, 2016, the Board of Directors authorized the issuance of stock options under this plan to selected employees, directors and consultants. The 2,850,000 stock options vest immediately upon the grant date and authorize the recipient to purchase shares of common stock at $.80 per share within five years of the grant date. The Company valued the issuance of these options using the Black Scholes valuation model assuming a .84% risk free rate and 61.4% volatility. At the six months ended June 30, 2016, the vested value of the options was $4,633. This was recorded as compensation expense.

 

 On April 15, 2016, the Board of Directors authorized the issuance of stock options under this plan to a consultant. The 250,000 stock options vested immediately upon the grant date and authorized the recipient to purchase shares of common stock at $1.00 per share within five years of the grant date. The Company valued the issuance of these options using the Black Scholes valuation model assuming a .53% risk free rate and 57.2% volatility. At the six months ended June 30, 2016, the vested value of $503,762 was expensed.

 

The following is a summary of the status of all Company’s stock options as of June 30, 2016 and changes during the six months ended on that date:

 

    Number     Weighted  
    of Stock     Average  
    Options     Exercise Price  
Oustanding at January 1, 2016     0     $ -  
Granted     3,100,000     $ 0.82  
Exercised     0     $ -  
Cancelled     0     $ -  
Outstanding at June 30, 2016     3,100,000     $ 0.82  
Options exercisable at June 30, 2016     3,100,000     $ 0.82  

 

  F-11  
 

 

eWellness Healthcare Corporation

Notes to Condensed Financial Statements

(unaudited)

 

Warrants

 

On June 2, 2016, the Company authorized the issuance of 60,000 warrants that were issued as part of a stock purchase agreement for $120,000.

 

On June 10, 2016, the Company authorized the issuance of 100,000 warrants that were issued as part of the extension of a convertible note dated December 7, 2015. The fair value of the warrants is $111,792.

 

During the six months ended June 30, 2016, the Company issued 1,200,000 warrants as part of the extensions of promissory notes dated December 15, 2014, March 14, 2016 and May 1, 2016. The fair value of all warrants is $1,839,652.

 

The following is a summary of the status of all of the Company’s warrants as of June 30, 2016 and changes during the six months ended on that date:

 

          Weighted  
    Number of     Average  
    Warrants     Exercise Price  
Outstanding at January 1, 2015     609,533     $ 0.35  
Granted     5,021,658     $ 0.63  
Exercised     -     $ -  
Cancelled     -     $ -  
Outstanding at December 31, 2015     5,631,191     $ 0.61  
Granted     1,360,000     $ 0.85  
Exercised     -     $ -  
Cancelled     -     $ -  
Outstanding at June 30, 2016     6,991,191     $ 0.65  

 

For purpose of determining the fair market value of the warrants issued during the six months ended June 30, 2016, we used the Black Scholes option valuation model. These valuations were done throughout the period at the date of issuance and not necessarily as of the reporting date. The significant assumptions used in the Black Scholes valuation of the date of issuance are as follows:

 

Stock price on the valuation date   $ 2.00-3.75  
Exercise price of warrants   $ .80 and 1.00  
Dividend yield     0.00 %
Years to maturity     1-5  
Risk free rate    

1.06%-1.32

%
Expected volatility    

61.41%-63.40

%

 

  F-12  
 

 

eWellness Healthcare Corporation

Notes to Condensed Financial Statements

(unaudited)

 

Note 10. Commitments, Contingencies

 

The Company may be subject to lawsuits, administrative proceedings, regulatory reviews or investigations associated with its business and other matters arising in the normal conduct of its business. The following is a description of an uncertainty that is considered other than ordinary, routine and incidental to the business.

 

The closing of the Initial Exchange Agreement with Private Co. was conditioned upon certain, limited customary representations and warranties, as well as, among other things, our compliance with Rule 419 (“Rule 419”) of Regulation C under the Securities Act of 1933, as amended (the “Securities Act”) and the consent of our shareholders as required under Rule 419. Accordingly, we conducted a “Blank Check” offering subject to Rule 419 (the “Rule 419 Offering”) and filed a Registration Statement on Form S-1 to register the shares of such offering; the Registration Statement was declared effective on September 14, 2012. We used 10% of the subscription proceeds as permitted under Rule 419 and the amount remaining in the escrow trust as of the date of the closing of the Share Exchange was $90,000 (the “Trust Account Balance”).

 

Rule 419 required that the Share Exchange occur on or before March 18, 2014, but due to normal negotiations regarding the transactions and the parties’ efforts to satisfy all of the closing conditions, the Share Exchange did not close on such date. Accordingly, after numerous discussions with management of both parties, they entered into an Amended and Restated Share Exchange Agreement (the “Share Exchange Agreement”) to reflect a revised business combination structure, pursuant to which we would: (i) file a registration statement on Form 8-A (“Form 8A”) to register our common stock pursuant to Section 12(g) of the Exchange Act, which we did on May 1, 2014 and (ii) seek to convert the participants of the Rule 419 Offering into participants of a similarly termed private offering (the “Converted Offering”), to be conducted pursuant to Regulation D, as promulgated under the Securities Act.

 

Fifty-two persons participated in the Rule 419 Offering and each of them gave the Company his/her/its consent to use his/her/its escrowed funds to purchase shares of the Company’s restricted common stock in the Converted Offering (the “Consent”) rather than have their funds returned. To avoid further administrative work for the investors, we believe that we took reasonable steps to inform investors of the situation and provided them with an appropriate opportunity to maintain their investment in the Company, if they so choose, or have their funds physically returned. Management believed the steps it took constituted a constructive return of the funds and therefore met the requirements of Rule 419.

 

However, pursuant to Rule 419(e)(2)(iv), “funds held in the escrow or trust account shall be returned by first class mail or equally prompt means to the purchaser within five business days [if the related acquisition transaction does not occur by a date that is 18 months after the effective date of the related registration statement].” As set forth above, rather than physically return the funds, we sought consent from the investors of the Rule 419 Offering to direct their escrowed funds to the Company to instead purchase shares in the Converted Offering. The consent document (which was essentially a form of rescission) was given to the investors along with a private placement memorandum describing the Converted Offering and stated that any investor who elected not to participate in the Converted Offering would get 90% of their funds physically returned. Pursuant to Rule 419(b)(2)(vi), a blank check company is entitled to use 10% of the proceed/escrowed funds; therefore, if a return of funds is required, only 90% of the proceed/escrowed funds need be returned. The Company received $100,000 proceeds and used $10,000 as per Rule 419(b)(2)(vi); therefore, only $90,000 was subject to possible return.

 

  F-13  
 

 

eWellness Healthcare Corporation

Notes to Condensed Financial Statements

(unaudited)

 

As disclosed therein, we filed the amendments to the initial Form 8-K in response to comments from the SEC regarding the Form 8-K and many of those comments pertain to an alleged violation of Rule 419. The Company continued to provide the SEC with information and analysis as to why it believes it did not violate Rule 419, but was unable to satisfy the SEC’s concerns. Comments and communications indicate that Rule 419 requires a physical return of funds if a 419 offering cannot be completed because a business combination was not consummated within the required time frame; constructive return is not permitted.

 

As a result of these communications and past comments, we are disclosing that we did not comply with the requirements of Rule 419, which required us to physically return the funds previously submitted to escrow pursuant to the Rule 419 Offering. As a result of our failure to comply with Rule 419, the SEC may bring an enforcement action or commence litigation against us for failure to strictly comply with Rule 419. If any claims or actions were to be brought against us relating to our lack of compliance with Rule 419, we could be subject to penalties (including criminal penalties), required to pay fines, make damages payments or settlement payments. In addition, any claims or actions could force us to expend significant financial resources to defend ourselves, could divert the attention of our management from our core business and could harm our reputation.

 

Ultimately, the SEC determined to terminate its review of the Initial Form 8-K and related amendments, rather than provide us with additional opportunities to address their concerns and therefore, we did not clear their comments. It is not possible at this time to predict whether or when the SEC may initiate any proceedings, when this issue may be resolved or what, if any, penalties or other remedies may be imposed, and whether any such penalties or remedies would have a material adverse effect on our consolidated financial position, results of operations, or cash flows. Litigation and enforcement actions are inherently unpredictable, the outcome of any potential lawsuit or action is subject to significant uncertainties and, therefore, determining at this time the likelihood of a loss, any SEC enforcement action and/or the measurement of the amount of any loss is complex. Consequently, we are unable to estimate the range of reasonably possible loss. Our assessment is based on an estimate and assumption that has been deemed reasonable by management, but the assessment process relies heavily on an estimate and assumption that may prove to be incomplete or inaccurate, and unanticipated events and circumstances may occur that might cause us to change that estimate and assumption. In light of the uncertainty of this issue and while Management evaluates the best and most appropriate way to resolve same, management determined to create a reserve on the Company’s Balance Sheet for the $90,000 that was subject to the Consent.

 

The Company rents its Culver City, CA office space from a company owned by our CEO. The rental agreement provides for the value of the rent of $500 per month be recorded as contributed towards the founding eWellness and its operations. During the period ended June 30, 2016, we have recorded this rent payment in the Consolidated Statements of Operations and Additional Paid in Capital on the Balance Sheet. 

 

On April 1, 2015, the Company entered into an Operating Agreement with Evolution Physical Therapy (“EPT”), a company owned by one of the Company’s officers, wherein it is agreed that EPT would be able to operate the Company’s telemedicine platform www.phzio.com and offer it to selected physical therapy patients of EPT. The Company is to receive 75% of the net insurance reimbursements from the patient for use of the platform. The Company will advance capital requested by EPT for costs specifically associated with operating the www.phzio,com platform and associated physical therapy treatments – computer equipment, office or facilities rental payments, physical therapist or physical therapy assistant, administrative staff, patient induction equipment, office supplies, utilities and other associated operating costs. It is anticipated that the operation of the platform by EPT will generate positive cash flow within 90 days from the start of patient induction.

 

  F-14  
 

 

eWellness Healthcare Corporation

Notes to Condensed Financial Statements

(unaudited)

 

On May 20, 2015, the Company entered into an agreement with Mavericks Capital Securities LLC (“Mavericks”). The term of the contract begins on the effective date and can be terminated within 30 days upon written notice by either party. The Company is to pay Mavericks a monthly retainer fee of $10,000 that is deferred until the Company raises $250,000 in new investor funds from the effective date. In addition, the Company granted Mavericks 250,000 warrants to purchase Company common stock at $.35 per share. On September 28, 2015, the Company and Mavericks entered into an amendment to the consultant agreement pursuant to which Mavericks will also assist the Company in the acquisition of new customers, for which the Company shall pay Mavericks 10% of the revenue received by the Company, net of any pass through costs, from any such customers introduced to the Company by Mavericks; payment shall be made upon the Company’s receipt of such revenues. In the amendment, the parties also further clarified the definition of Customer Acquisition.

 

On January 20, 2016, the Company entered into a one year agreement with a consulting firm to provide marketing and financial media awareness services. Compensation for this agreement is the issuance of 100,000 shares of common stock – 50,000 were issued at the signing of the agreement and the other 50,000 are to be issued in July, 2016. As of the filing of this report, these shares have not been issued. The value of these shares is $5,000 for each issuance which is being amortized over the term of the contract.

 

On February 1, 2016, the Company entered into a six month agreement with a consulting firm for services including introductions to brokers, investment bankers, market makers and business development opportunities. Compensation for his agreement is the issuance of 100,000 shares of common stock. The value of these shares is $10,000 and is being amortized over the term of the contract.

 

On March 3, 2016, the Company entered into a six month agreement with a consulting firm for management consulting, business advisory and public relations services. Compensation for this agreement is the issuance of 100,000 shares of common stock for the purchase price of $100 and a $2,500 monthly fee that is to be accrued and not payable until the Company closes a qualified financing.

 

On April 13, 2016, we entered into a one-year renewable advisory agreement with Dan Mills, MPT to become the Company’s chairman of the to-be-formed committee known as the eWellness Physical Therapy Clinical Advisory Board and to act as the Company’s national spokesperson at the American Physical Therapy Association (“APTA”).

 

As inducement for Mr. Mills to enter the Agreement, we agreed to issue 250,000 immediately vesting common stock purchase warrants at a price of $1.00 per share. The fair value of the warrants is $503,762. The common stock underlying the warrants has piggy-back registration rights. In addition, 10,000 shares of common stock were issued with a value of $30,000. Per the agreement Mr. Mills will receive $0.50 cents per PHZIO session that an APTA members uses and $500 per month in consulting fees.

 

  F-15  
 

 

eWellness Healthcare Corporation

Notes to Condensed Financial Statements

(unaudited)

 

On May 23, 2016, the Company entered into a one-year agreement with a financial advisory consultant. Compensation for this agreement is the issuance of 450,000 shares of common stock that vest on January 2, 2017. The value of these shares is $1,669,500 and is being amortized over the term of the contact.

 

 From time to time the Company may become a party to litigation matters involving claims against the Company. Except as may be outlined above, the Company believes that there are no current matters that would have a material effect on the Company’s financial position or results of operations.

 

Note 11. Derivative Valuation

 

The warrants granted with the $275,000 senior convertible promissory note (the “Note”) issued on December 7, 2015 (described in Note 8) have a Most Favored Nation clause resulting in the exercise price of the warrants not being fixed. Therefore, this feature has been characterized as a derivate liability to be re-measured at the end of every reporting period with the change in value reported in the statement of operations. During the three and six months ended June 30, 2016, the outstanding fair value of the warrants accounted for as a derivative liability amounted to $782,944. As of June 30, 2016, a loss of $505,142 was recognized in the statement of operations as the change in valuation from inception.

 

For purposes of determining the fair market value of the derivative liability for the warrants and the convertible note, the Company used Black Scholes option valuation model. The significant assumptions used in the Black Scholes valuation of the derivative are as follows:

 

Stock price at valuation date   $ 1.75  
Exercise price of warrants   $ 0.75-1.00  
Risk free interest rate     0.2-1.01 %
Stock volatility factor     49.70-62.65 %
Years to Maturity     .03-4.44  
Expected dividend yield     None  

 

Note 12. Subsequent Events

 

On July 5, 2016, the Company entered into a six-month agreement with an investment and business consultant for certain investment and business matters. Compensation for this agreement is the issuance of 125,000 shares of common stock.

 

  F-16  
 

 

eWellness Healthcare Corporation

Notes to Condensed Financial Statements

(unaudited)

 

On July 8, 2016, the Company entered into a five year business development agreement with a consultant for marketing the Company’s telemedicine platform to its customers. Upon the completion of a partnership for the Company with a large scale California employer and/or one of its affiliate institutions that includes at least a 100 patient pilot study, the Company agrees to issue 50,000 $1.00 common stock 5-year purchase warrants. For each additional licensing of 20 physical therapy professionals through the consultant, the Company will issue an additional 50,000 common stock 5-year purchase warrants priced at market at the time of issuance. For any direct investor introduced by the consultant, the Company will pay a 5% cash fee on the gross amount invested.

 

On July 12, 2016, the Company agreed to an extension on a promissory note dated December 7, 2015. As an inducement for the extension of this note, the Company agreed to pay a $10,000 loan extension fee and issue 300,000 warrants to purchase Company common stock at $.50 per share.

 

On July 13, 2016, the Company issued 172,958 shares of common stock as a result of warrants being exercised.

 

On July 13, 2016, the Company agreed to amend certain previous warrants granted on August 28, 2015, September 16, 2015, October 3, 2015, December 6, 2015, March 14, 2016, May 1, 2016, and June 20, 2016. The previously granted warrants had a purchase price of $.80 per share and the Company has agreed to reduce that to $.50 per share. Amendments for these warrants were issued.

 

On July 14, 2016, the Company issued a 30-day promissory note to a shareholder of $177,762 as an extension for notes with a shareholder dated May 30 2015, July 15, 2015, September 16, 2015, October 11, 2015, December 6, 2015, March 14, 2016, May 2, 2016, and June 11, 2016. The amount of the note includes interest accrued on the previous notes, risky loan fee and a default fee. The note has an annual interest rate of 12% due and payable on August 15, 2016. As an inducement for this promissory note, the Company issued 300,000 warrants to purchase Company common stock at $.50 per share.

 

  F-17  
 

 

ITEM 2. MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS

 

FORWARD-LOOKING STATEMENTS

 

This Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q, including “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations” in Item 2 of Part I of this report include forward-looking statements. These forward looking statements are based on our management’s current expectations and beliefs and involve numerous risks and uncertainties that could cause actual results to differ materially from expectations. In some cases, you can identify forward-looking statements by terminology such as “may,” “should,” “expects,” “plans,” “anticipates,” “believes,” “estimates,” “predicts,” “potential,” “proposed,” “intended,” or “continue” or the negative of these terms or other comparable terminology. You should read statements that contain these words carefully, because they discuss our expectations about our future operating results or our future financial condition or state other “forward-looking” information. Many factors could cause our actual results to differ materially from those projected in these forward-looking statements, including but not limited to: variability of our future revenues and financial performance; risks associated with product development and technological changes; the acceptance of our products in the marketplace by potential future customers; general economic conditions. You should be aware that the occurrence of any of the events described in this Quarterly Report could substantially harm our business, results of operations and financial condition, and that upon the occurrence of any of these events, the trading price of our securities could decline. Although we believe that the expectations reflected in the forward-looking statements are reasonable, we cannot guarantee future results, growth rates, levels of activity, performance or achievements. We are under no duty to update any of the forward-looking statements after the date of this Quarterly Report to conform these statements to actual results.

 

The following discussion and analysis of financial condition and results of operations relates to the operations and financial condition reported in the financial statements of eWellness Healthcare Corporation for the three and six months ended June 30, 2016 and 2015 and should be read in conjunction with such financial statements and related notes included in this report and the Company’s Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2015.

 

THE COMPANY

 

Business Overview

 

Our business model is to license our PHZIO (“PHZIO”) telemedicine platform to any physical therapy (“PT”) clinic in the U.S. and or have large-scale employers use our PHZIO platform as a fully PT monitored corporate wellness program.

 

As shown in the financial statements accompanying this Quarterly Report, the Company has had no revenues to date and has incurred only losses since its inception. The Company has operations currently only in Culver City, California and has been issued a “going concern” opinion from our accountants, based upon the Company’s reliance upon the sale of our common stock as the sole source of funds for our future operations.

 

The Company’s operations and corporate offices are located at 11825 Major Street Culver City, CA, 90230, with a telephone number of (310) 915-9700.

 

The Company’s fiscal year end is December 31.

 

Plan of Operations

 

The Company’s initial licensee is Evolution Physical Therapy (“EPT”), which is owned by our CEO, Darwin Fogt, MPT. Treatment revenue for the first six months of 2016 was retained by EPT for expenses so no revenue was generated for the Company. The Company is in the process of developing marketing channel partnerships with industry association members, existing software-based telemedicine providers and physical therapy billing and practice management providers. These Software as Service (“SaaS”) licenses to third party physical therapy clinic and these other partnerships, if completed, are anticipated to begin adding third party PT licensee revenue during the third or fourth quarters of 2016.

 

  3  
 

 

The Company’s PHZIO home physical therapy exercise platform has been designed to disrupt the $30 billion physical therapy and the $8 billion corporate wellness industries. PHZIO re-defines the way physical therapy can be delivered. PHZIO is the first real-time remote monitored 1-to-many physical therapy platform for home use. Due to the real-time patient monitoring feature, the PHZIO platform is insurance reimbursable by payers such as: Anthem Blue Cross and Blue Shield.

 

The PHZIO Solution: A New Physical Therapy Delivery System

 

  SaaS technology platform solution for providers bundling rehabilitation services and employer wellness programs;
     
  First real-time remote monitored 1-to-many physical therapy treatment platform for home use;
     
  Ability for physical therapists to observe multiple patients simultaneously in real-time;
     
  Solves what has been a structural problem and limitation in post-acute care practice growth.
     
  Based on the Company’s experience, PT practices can experience 20% higher adherence & compliance rates versus industry standards; and
     
  Based on the Company’s experience, we have tracked a 30% increase in net income for a PT practice.

 

Based on the Company’s experience, patient program adherence in 2015 and the first half of 2016 was nearly 85 percent due to the real-time patient monitoring and the at-home use of the platform. Now physical therapy practices have a way to scale profitably using a technology platform that can help them grow beyond the limits of the typical brick and mortar PT clinic.

 

Additional Treatment Protocols: The Company’s initial PHZIO application is a 6-month exercise program for patients with back, knee or hip pain. The next two platforms are anticipated to be released in the third quarter of 2016 include a total knee and hip replacement exercise program. These hip and knee programs have been designed to be integrated into any hospital or medical group’s Medicare CMS bundled payment model for post-acute care physical therapy. These two programs are anticipated to be followed by woman’s health and geriatric programs by the end of the fourth quarter of 2016.

 

Our PHZIO platform enables employees or patients to engage with live or on-demand video based physical therapy telemedicine treatments from their home or office. Following a physician’s exam and prescription for physical therapy to treat back, knee or hip pain, a patient can be examined by a physical therapist and, if found appropriate, inducted in the Company’s PHZIO program that includes a progressive 6-month telemedicine exercise program (including monthly in-clinic checkups). All PHZIO treatments are monitored by a licensed therapist that sees everything the patient is doing while providing their professional guidance and feedback in real-time. This ensures treatment compliance by the patient, maintains the safety and integrity of the prescribed exercises, tracks patient metrics and captures pre and post treatment evaluation data. PHZIO unlocks a host of potential for revolutionizing patient treatment models and directly links back to the established brick and mortar physical therapy clinic. This unique model enables any physical therapy practice to be able to execute more patient care while utilizing their same resources, and creates more value than was ever before possible.

 

During 2015 and the first half of 2016 our PHZIO platform achieved the following metrics:

 

  The total monitored PHZIO patient visits was approximately 1,200 .
     
  The average insurance reimbursement per PHZIO session in 2015: $46.87 (excluding co-payments).
     
  Based on the Company’s experience, the top line wellness goals of our PHZIO program are to graduate at least 80% of inducted patients through our 6-month program. Patients should expect to experience an average of a 20% reduction in BMI, a 4-inch reduction in waist size, weight loss of at least 20 pounds, significant overall improvement in balance, coordination, flexibility, strength, and lumbopelvic stability. Patients also should score better on Functional Outcomes Scales (Oswestry and LEFS), which indicates improved functional activity levels due to reduced low back, knee and hip pain.

 

  4  
 

 

2016 PHZIO Customer Acquisition & Sales Goals

 

On September 6, 2016, we plan to commercially launch the licensing of our PHZIO platform to 3rd party physical therapy practices throughout the U.S.

 

The American Physical Therapy Association (APTA), Private Practice Section (PPS) members are our initial universe of PT practices to target. Our sale launch begins with full-page print advertising in the PT industry's premier magazine Impact in early September 2016. It is then to be followed up with a full-page ad in the APTA PPS Conference Buyers Guide in early October. Following these two print advertisements, we will also be a tier 1 sponsor at the PPS Las Vegas conference from October 19-22, 2016 (October 20th Lunch Sponsor and 4-6pm Cocktail Reception Sponsor & Exclusive PHZIO Demo Session for all attendees).  PHZIO will also have a full-page ad included in November 2016 and January 2017 Impact magazine issues. Our 2016 Customer Acquisition & Sales goals are to on-board at least 35 third-party PT practices during the 3rd and 4th quarter of 2016. Each on-boarded PT practice will have a goal of inducting at least 3 new patients per week onto our PHZIO platform with a goal of delivering at least 17,000 PHZIO exercise session in the second half of 2016. Based upon achieving this number of PHZIO sessions, it would generate approximately $344,000 in gross revenue for the Company, during the second half of 2016. Our planned sales launch includes industry advertising, lead generation and qualification program, which is anticipated to be implemented through a strategic partnership with a US-based sales support organization through a revenue share agreement. Our customer acquisition and sales strategy includes:

 

Lead Generation and Qualification through a call center that utilizes well-designed program stimuli and tactics, as well as strong agent lead qualification and closing skills. Next, based upon advertising to the PPS membership, we also plan to include an Inbound Sales team to handle virtually any type of inbound hard-or soft-sell sales call that embodies a sales performance-based culture. Our strategic partner will not be a typical script-driven order taking call center, they will embrace the natural dialogue and relationship skills necessary to turn every contact opportunity into a sale. Lastly, we anticipate an Outbound Sales to the PPS membership through mail, phone and e-mail, will be handled within the confines of privacy laws and regulations, where we anticipate creating an effective vehicles for gathering customer information, bringing awareness to discounts or promotions, and serving as a proactive retention tool for valued customers.

 

Customer Relationship Management (CRM)

 

We will also be implementing a CRM that provides practices, strategies and technologies that we will use to manage and analyze customer interactions and data throughout the customer lifecycle, with the goal of improving business relationships with customers, assisting in customer retention and driving sales growth. CRM systems are designed to compile information on customers across different channels — or points of contact between the customer and the company — which could include the company’s website, telephone, live chat, direct mail, marketing materials and social media. CRM systems can also give customer-facing staff detailed information on customers’ personal information, purchase history, buying preferences and concerns.

 

Our PHZIO platform, including: design, testing, exercise intervention, follow-up, and exercise demonstration, has been developed by accomplished Los Angeles based physical therapist Darwin Fogt. Mr. Fogt has extensive experience and education working with diverse populations from professional athletes to morbidly obese. He understands the most beneficial exercise prescription to achieve optimal results and has had great success in motivating all patient types to stay consistent in working toward their goals. Additionally, his methods have proven effective and safe as he demonstrates exercises with attention to proper form to avoid injury. Mr. Fogt has established himself as a national leader in his field and has successfully implemented progressive solutions to delivering physical therapy: he has consulted with and been published by numerous national publications including Runner’s World, Men’s Health, Men’s Journal, and various Physical Therapy specific magazines; his 13 plus years of experience include rehabilitating the general population, as well as professional athletes, Olympic gold medalists, and celebrities. He has bridged the gap between physical therapy and fitness by opening Evolution Fitness, which uses licensed physical therapists to teach high intensity circuit training fitness classes. He also founded one of the first exclusive prenatal and postnatal physical therapy clinics in the country. Mr. Fogt is a leader in advancing the profession to incorporate research-based methods and focus on, not only rehabilitation but also wellness, functional fitness, performance, and prevention. He is able to recognize that the national healthcare structure (federal and private insurance) is moving toward a model of prevention and that the physical therapy profession will take a larger role in providing wellness services to patients.

 

  5  
 

 

Innovators in other industries have solved access, cost and quality inefficiencies through the implementation of technology platforms and business models that deliver products and services on-demand and create new economies by connecting and empowering both consumers and businesses. We have taken the same approach to solving the pervasive access, cost and quality challenges facing the current access to physical therapy clinics.

 

Our underlying technology platform is complex, deeply integrated and purpose-built over the three years for the evolving physical therapy marketplace. Our PHZIO platform is highly scalable and can support substantial growth of third party licensees. Our PHZIO platform provides for broad interconnectivity between PT practitioners and their patients and, we believe, uniquely positions us as a focal point in the rapidly evolving PT industry to introduce innovative, technology-based solutions, such as remote patient monitoring, post-discharge treatment plan adherence and in-home care.

 

We plan to generate revenue from third-party PT and corporate wellness licensees on a contractually recurring per PHZIO session fee basis. Our PHZIO platform is anticipated to transform the access, cost and quality dynamics of physical therapy delivery for all of the market participants. We further believe any patient, employer, health plan or healthcare professional interested in a better approach to physical therapy is a potential PHZIO platform user.

 

We have developed various key performance indicators that we anticipate using to assess our business after we on-board third party PT licensees later in the year.

 

Before even launching, we have received a high indication of interest in our service. We think the demand is warranted, but recognize that in the early stages of our services, we may experience bottlenecks in our ability to meet the demand for same. Under this type of environment it is critical to maintain awareness of the Company’s operational budget goals and how they are being met in our attempts to address demand. Because the Company is “early stage” and launching with a minimum of capital, monitoring cash flow on a constant basis will be essential to growth.

 

During the third quarter of 2015, we pivoted our business model to focus on licensing our PHZIO platform to any physical therapy clinics in the U.S. and or to have large scale employers use our platform as a corporate wellness program. The Physical Therapy industry has remained disconnected and unscalable throughout the technological revolution of the past twenty years. Over 200,000 Physical Therapists are limited to one-on-one patient treatments within a traditional clinic setting. The Physical Therapy industry measures $33 Billion in size with over 270 Million one-on-one treatments delivered annually. This technology gap and market size is the opportunity that the Company is focused on with the recent launch of its PHZIO telemedicine platform.[1]

 

1 Sources: Harris Williams & Co., Physical Therapy Market Overview, Feb 2014 IBIS World, Physical Therapists in the US (Report 62134), May 2015

 

Our PHZIO platform enables patients to engage with live or on-demand video based physical therapy telemedicine treatments from their home or office. Following a physician’s exam and prescription for physical therapy to treat back, knee or hip pain, a patient can be examined by a physical therapist and if found appropriate inducted in eWellness’ PHZIO program that includes a progressive 6-month telemedicine exercise program (including weekly in-clinic exercise sessions and monthly in-clinic checkups. All PHZIO treatments are monitored by a licensed therapist that sees everything the patient is doing while providing their professional guidance and feedback in real-time. This ensures treatment compliance by the patient, maintains the safety and integrity of the prescribed exercises, tracks patient metrics and captures pre and post treatment evaluation data. PHZIO unlocks a host of potential for revolutionizing patient treatment models and directly links back to the established brick and mortar Physical Therapy clinic. This unique model enables any physical therapy practice to be able to execute more patient care while utilizing their same resources, and creates more value than was ever before possible.

 

Through our Cooperative Operating Agreement with Evolution Physical Therapy (“EPT”) their Marina del Rey, California patient induction office (“PIO”) is effectively a laboratory for us to support the licensing of our platform to the entire Physical Therapy (“PT”) industry. In April we moved the PIO to EPT’s Culver City location as we could not extend the lease at that location. Active PT licensing of our PHZIO platform is anticipated to begin in the third quarter of 2016. We have also developed a separate vertical for our PHZIO platform that focuses on the marketing of our platform as a robust Corporate Wellness program. Active marketing to the large scale employers in the Los Angeles area began in the October 2015 with the first corporate wellness program first pilot program with a Los Angeles based university commencing in the second quarter of 2016.

 

  6  
 

 

We are also actively seeking corporate partnership relationships with other telemedicine companies that if completed, would create a new channel for our corporate wellness PHZIO program. Amid ongoing challenges and changes within the healthcare industry, telemedicine is emerging as an increasingly attractive tool for delivering quality medical & wellness services.

 

In early 2016, we began offering our PHZIO program that has been designed to be the most productive physical exercise program available to corporate wellness programs and their employees. We anticipate that employers using our system can significantly improve employee wellness and decrease costs associated with workman’s compensation claims. PHZIO is a comprehensive lifestyle management intervention. Our PHZIO exercise program documents an employee’s success or failure. We can provision highly reliable Return On Investment (“ROI”) metrics displayed on an easy to use HIPAA compliant dashboard for any organization using our PHZIO system.

 

The Current State of Workplace Wellness Programs:

 

Broadly, a workplace wellness program is an employment-based activity or employer-sponsored benefit aimed at promoting health-related behaviors (primary prevention or health promotion) and disease management (secondary prevention). It may include a combination of data collection on employee health risks and population-based strategies paired with individually focused interventions to reduce those risks. A formal and universally accepted definition of a workplace wellness program has yet to emerge, and employers define and manage their programs differently. Programs may be part of a group health plan or be offered outside of that context; they may range from narrow offerings, such as free gym memberships, to comprehensive counseling and lifestyle management interventions4.

 

Wellness programs have become very common, as 92 percent of employers with 200 or more employees reported offering them in 2009. Survey data indicate that the most frequently targeted behaviors are exercise, addressed by 63 percent of employers with programs; smoking (60 percent); and weight loss (53 percent). In spite of widespread availability, the actual participation of employees in such programs remains limited. While no nationally representative data exist, a 2010 non-representative survey suggests that typically fewer than 20 percent of eligible employees participate in wellness interventions.

 

Wellness Program Impact: In industry surveys, employers typically express their conviction that workplace wellness programs are delivering on their promise to improve health and reduce costs. Numerous anecdotal accounts of positive program effects are consistent with this optimistic view. Further, several evaluations of individual programs and summative reviews in the scientific literature provide corroborating evidence for a positive impact.

 

In “A Review of the U.S. Workplace Wellness Market “, the most recent scientific literature evaluating the impact of workplace wellness programs on health-related behavior and medical cost outcomes identified 33 peer-reviewed publications that met their standards for methodological rigor. They found, consistent with previous reviews, evidence for positive effects on diet, exercise, smoking, alcohol use, physiologic markers, and health care costs, but limited evidence for effects on absenteeism and mental health. They could not conclusively determine whether or not program intensity was positively correlated with impact. Positive results found in this and other studies should be interpreted with caution, as many of these programs were not evaluated with a rigorous approach, and published results may not be representative of the typical experience of a U.S. employer.

 

  7  
 

 

The Company completed the initial closing of a private financing of up to $120,000 in June, 2016, pursuant to Rule 506 (c) promulgated pursuant to the Securities Act of 1933, as amended.

 

Results of Operations for the three and six months ended June 30, 2016 and June 30, 2015.

 

The following discussion should be read in conjunction with our financial statements and the related notes that appear elsewhere in this Quarterly Report.

 

Operating Expenses

 

Operating expenses for the three months ended June 30, 2016 and June 30, 2015 were $972,553 and $397,952, respectively. Operating expenses during the six months ended June 30, 2016 and June 30, 2015 were $1,326,000 and $708,934, respectively. Operating expenses increased for the six and three month periods primarily as a result of an increase in professional fees for consulting services.

 

Interest Expense.

 

Interest expense, including interest expense-related parties, was $449,729 and $36,158, for the three months ended June 30, 2016 and June 30, 2015, respectively. Interest expense, including interest expense–related parties, was $521,890 and $23,348 for the six months ended June 30, 2016 and June 30, 2015, respectively. The increase was related to costs of convertible debt with unrelated parties.

 

Net Loss

 

Net loss during the three months ended June 30, 2016 and June 30, 2015 was $1,927,424 and $434,080, respectively. Net loss during the six months ended June 30, 2016 and June 30, 2015 totaled $2,353,032 and $720,959, respectively. The increase in the net loss is a result of increased operating expenses and interest expense as discussed above.

 

Liquidity and Capital Resources

 

The Company had $12,249 and $41,951 cash as of June 30, 2016 and December 31, 2015, respectively.

 

Net cash used in operating activities was $149,702 for the six months ended June 30, 2016, compared to $287,169 for the six months ended June 30, 2015.

 

Net cash used in investing activities was $0 for the six months ended June 30, 2016, compared to $4,207 for the six months ended June 30, 2015.

 

Net cash provided by financing activities during the six months ended June 30, 2016, was $120,000 compared to $295,080 for the six months ended June 30, 2015.

 

We had not yet earned any revenues during the period ended June 30, 2016. Our current cash position is not sufficient to fund our cash requirements during the next twelve months including operations and capital expenditures. These factors raise substantial doubt about the Company’s ability to continue as a going concern. The financial statements of the Company do not include any adjustments relating to the recoverability and classification of recorded assets, or the amounts and classifications of liabilities that might be necessary should the Company be unable to continue as a going concern.

 

We had assets at June 30, 2016 of $2,050,769. We will be reliant upon shareholder loans, private placements or public offerings of equity to fund any kind of operations, although there can be no guarantee we will be able to secure such finding on beneficial terms, if at all. We have secured no sources of loans.

 

  8  
 

 

Contingencies

 

The Company may be subject to lawsuits, administrative proceedings, regulatory reviews or investigations associated with its business and other matters arising in the normal conduct of its business. The following is a description of an uncertainty that is considered other than ordinary, routine and incidental to the business.

 

The closing of the Initial Exchange Agreement with Private Co. was conditioned upon certain, limited customary representations and warranties, as well as, among other things, our compliance with Rule 419 (“Rule 419”) of Regulation C under the Securities Act of 1933, as amended (the “Securities Act”) and the consent of our shareholders as required under Rule 419. Accordingly, we conducted a “Blank Check” offering subject to Rule 419 (the “Rule 419 Offering”) and filed a Registration Statement on Form S-1 to register the shares of such offering; the Registration Statement was declared effective on September 14, 2012. We used 10% of the subscription proceeds as permitted under Rule 419 and the amount remaining in the escrow trust as of the date of the closing of the Share Exchange was $90,000 (the “Trust Account Balance”).

 

Rule 419 required that the Share Exchange occur on or before March 18, 2014, but due to normal negotiations regarding the transactions and the parties’ efforts to satisfy all of the closing conditions, the Share Exchange did not close on such date. Accordingly, after numerous discussions with management of both parties, they entered into an Amended and Restated Share Exchange Agreement (the “Share Exchange Agreement”) to reflect a revised business combination structure, pursuant to which we would: (i) file a registration statement on Form 8-A (“Form 8A”) to register our common stock pursuant to Section 12(g) of the Exchange Act, which we did on May 1, 2014 and (ii) seek to convert the participants of the Rule 419 Offering into participants of a similarly termed private offering (the “Converted Offering”), to be conducted pursuant to Regulation D, as promulgated under the Securities Act.

 

Fifty-two persons participated in the Rule 419 Offering and each of them gave the Company his/her/its consent to use his/her/its escrowed funds to purchase shares of the Company’s restricted common stock in the Converted Offering (the “Consent”) rather than have their funds returned. To avoid further administrative work for the investors, we believe that we took reasonable steps to inform investors of the situation and provided them with an appropriate opportunity to maintain their investment in the Company, if they so choose, or have their funds physically returned. Management believed the steps it took constituted a constructive return of the funds and therefore met the requirements of Rule 419.

 

However, pursuant to Rule 419(e)(2)(iv), “funds held in the escrow or trust account shall be returned by first class mail or equally prompt means to the purchaser within five business days [if the related acquisition transaction does not occur by a date that is 18 months after the effective date of the related registration statement].” As set forth above, rather than physically return the funds, we sought consent from the investors of the Rule 419 Offering to direct their escrowed funds to the Company to instead purchase shares in the Converted Offering. The consent document was given to the investors along with a private placement memorandum describing the Converted Offering and stated that any investor who elected not to participate in the Converted Offering would get 90% of their funds physically returned. Pursuant to Rule 419(b)(2)(vi), a blank check company is entitled to use 10% of the proceed/escrowed funds; therefore, if a return of funds is required, only 90% of the proceed/escrowed funds need be returned. The Company received $100,000 proceeds and used $10,000 as per Rule 419(b)(2)(vi); therefore, only $90,000 was subject to possible return.

 

As disclosed in the prior amendments to the Initial Form 8-K, we have filed the prior amendments in response to comments from the SEC regarding the Form 8-K and many of those comments pertain to the Company’s potential violation of Rule 419. Although the Company has continued to provide the SEC with information and analysis as to why it believes it did not violate Rule 419, based upon latest communications with the persons reviewing the Form 8-K, they do not agree with the assessments the Company presented to them. Comments and communications indicate that Rule 419 requires a physical return of funds if a 419 offering cannot be completed because a business combination was not consummated within the required time frame; constructive return is not permitted.

 

  9  
 

 

As a result of these communications and past comments, we are disclosing that we did not comply with the requirements of Rule 419, which required us to physically return the funds previously submitted to escrow pursuant to the Rule 419 Offering. As a result of our failure to comply with Rule 419, the SEC may bring an enforcement action or commence litigation against us for failure to strictly comply with Rule 419. If any claims or actions were to be brought against us relating to our lack of compliance with Rule 419, we could be subject to penalties (including criminal penalties), required to pay fines, make damages payments or settlement payments. In addition, any claims or actions could force us to expend significant financial resources to defend ourselves, could divert the attention of our management from our core business and could harm our reputation.

 

Ultimately, the SEC determined to terminate its review of the Initial Form 8-K and related amendments, rather than provide us with additional opportunities to address their concerns and therefore, we did not clear their comments. It is not possible at this time to predict whether or when the SEC may initiate any proceedings, when this issue may be resolved or what, if any, penalties or other remedies may be imposed, and whether any such penalties or remedies would have a material adverse effect on our consolidated financial position, results of operations, or cash flows. Litigation and enforcement actions are inherently unpredictable, the outcome of any potential lawsuit or action is subject to significant uncertainties and, therefore, determining at this time the likelihood of a loss, any SEC enforcement action and/or the measurement of the amount of any loss is complex. Consequently, we are unable to estimate the range of reasonably possible loss. Our assessment is based on an estimate and assumption that has been deemed reasonable by management, but the assessment process relies heavily on an estimate and assumption that may prove to be incomplete or inaccurate, and unanticipated events and circumstances may occur that might cause us to change that estimate and assumption. In light of the uncertainty of this issue and while Management evaluates the best and most appropriate way to resolve same, management determined to create a reserve on the Company’s Balance Sheet for the $90,000 that was subject to the Consent.

 

Off-Balance Sheet Arrangements

 

There are no off-balance sheet arrangements that have or are reasonably likely to have a current or future effect on our financial condition, changes in financial condition, revenues or expenses, results of operations, liquidity, capital expenditures or capital resources that is material to investors.

 

Critical Accounting Policies and Estimates

 

Please refer to “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations,” in our Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2015, for disclosures regarding the Company’s critical accounting policies and estimates, as well as any updates further disclosed in our interim financial statements as described in this Form 10-Q.

 

ITEM 3. QUANTITATIVE AND QUALITATIVE DISCLOSURES ABOUT MARKET RISK

 

As a “smaller reporting company”, we are not required to provide the information under Item 3.

 

ITEM 4. CONTROLS AND PROCEDURES.

 

Evaluation of Disclosure Controls and Procedures

 

Our management, with the participation of our chief executive officer and chief financial officer, evaluated the effectiveness of our disclosure controls and procedures as defined in Rule 13a-15(e) under the Exchange Act as of the end of the period covered by this Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q. In designing and evaluating the disclosure controls and procedures, our management recognized that any controls and procedures, no matter how well designed and operated, can provide only reasonable assurance of achieving the desired control objectives. In addition, the design of disclosure controls and procedures must reflect the fact that there are resource constraints and that management is required to apply its judgment in evaluating the benefits of possible controls and procedures relative to their costs. The design of any disclosure controls and procedures also is based in part upon certain assumptions about the likelihood of future events and there can be no assurance that any design will succeed in achieving its stated goals under all potential future conditions.

 

Based on that evaluation, our chief executive officer and chief financial officer concluded that, as of June 30, 2016, our disclosure controls and procedures were not effective to provide reasonable assurance that information we are required to disclose in reports that we file or submit under the Exchange Act is (i) recorded, processed, summarized and reported within the time periods specified in Securities and Exchange Commission rules, regulations and forms, and (ii) that such information is accumulated and communicated to our management, including our chief executive officer and chief financial officer, as appropriate, to allow timely decisions regarding required disclosure.

 

Changes in Internal Controls Over Financial Reporting

 

There were no changes in the Company’s internal controls over financial reporting that occurred during the period covered by this report that have materially affected, or are reasonably likely to materially affect, our internal control over financial reporting.

 

  10  
 

 

PART II - OTHER INFORMATION

 

ITEM 2. UNREGISTERED SALES OF EQUITY SECURITIES AND USE OF PROCEEDS.

 

On April 15, 2016, the Company authorized the issuance of 10,000 shares for consulting services for a value of $30,000.

 

On May 17, 2016, the Company authorized the issuance of 100,000 shares for consulting services for a value of $10,000.

 

On May 23, 2016, the Company authorized the issuance of 450,000 shares for consulting services for a value of $1,669,500.

 

On June 2, 2016, the Company sold 120,000 shares for $120,000 cash.

 

As of the period ended June 30, 2016, the Company has 19,377,770 shares of common stock issued and outstanding.

 

All of the transactions listed above were made pursuant to the exemption from the registration provisions of the Securities Act of 1933, as amended, provided by Section 4(a)(2) of the Securities Act for sales not involving a public offering or Rule 506(b) of Regulation D promulgated by the SEC. The securities issued have not been registered under the Securities Act and may not be offered or sold in the United States absent registration or an applicable exemption from registration requirements.

 

ITEM 6. EXHIBITS.

 

Exhibit No.   Description
3.1   Amended & Restated Certificate of Incorporation of Registrant. (Incorporated by reference to Exhibit 4.1 to the Form 8-K/A filed on August 6, 2014)
     
3.2   Bylaws of the Company. (Incorporated by reference to Exhibit 3(b) to the Registration Statement on Form S-1 filed on May 15, 2012)
     
10.1   Securities Purchase Agreement dated December 23, 2014 (Incorporated by reference to the Company’s Current Report on Form 8-K filed on January 6, 2015)
     
10.2   Form of 12% Senior Convertible Promissory Note (Incorporated by reference to the Company’s Current Report on Form 8-K filed on January 6, 2015)
     
10.3   Form of Series A Warrant Agreement (Incorporated by reference to the Company’s Current Report on Form 8-K filed on January 6, 2015)
     
10.4   Form of Registration Rights Agreement (Incorporated by reference to the Company’s Current Report on Form 8-K filed on January 6, 2015)
     
10.5   Form of Security Agreement (Incorporated by reference to the Company’s Current Report on Form 8-K filed on January 6, 2015)
     
10.6   Operating Agreement with Evolution Physical Therapy (Incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.6 of the Company’s Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q filed on May 12, 2015)
     
10.7  

Medical Advisory Agreement with Akash Bajaj M.D., M.P.H. (Incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.7 of the Company’s Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q filed on May 12, 2015)

 

10.8  

Advisory Agreement *

 

31.1   Rule 13a-14(a)/15d-14(a) Principal Executive Officer Certification*
     
31.2   Rule 13a-14(a)/15d-14(a) Principal Financial and Accounting Officer Certification*
     
32.1   Certifications under Section 906 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act (18 U.S.C. Section 1350)*
     
32.2   Certification under Section 906 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act (18 U.S.C. Section 1350)*
     
101.INS   XBRL INSTANCE DOCUMENT *
     
101.SCH   XBRL TAXONOMY EXTENSION SCHEMA *
     
101.CAL   XBRL TAXONOMY EXTENSION CALCULATION LINKBASE *
     
101.DEF   XBRL TAXONOMY EXTENSION DEFINITION LINKBASE *
     
101.LAB   XBRL TAXONOMY EXTENSION LABEL LINKBASE *
     
101.PRE   XBRL TAXONOMY EXTENSION PRESENTATION LINKBASE *

 

* Filed herewith

 

  11  
 

 

SIGNATURES

 

Pursuant to the requirements of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, the registrant has duly caused this report to be signed on its behalf by the undersigned, thereunto duly authorized.

 

  eWellness Healthcare Corporation
     
Date: August 17, 2016 By: /s/ Darwin Fogt
    Darwin Fogt
    Director and Chief Executive Officer
    (Principal Executive Officer)
     
Date: August 17, 2016 By: /s/ David Markowski
    David Markowski, Chief Financial Officer
    (Principal Financial and Accounting Officer)

 

  12  
 

 

 

EXHIBIT 31.1

 

Exhibit 31.1 Certification of the Chief Executive Officer of eWellness Healthcare Corporation., pursuant to Section 302 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002

 

I, Darwin Fogt, certify that:

 

1. I have reviewed this Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q for the quarterly period ended June 30, 2016 of eWellness Healthcare Corporation (the “registrant”);

 

2. Based on my knowledge, this report does not contain any untrue statement of a material fact or omit to state a material fact necessary to make the statements made, in light of the circumstances made, not misleading with respect to the period covered by this report;

 

3. Based on my knowledge, the financial statements, and other financial information included in this report, fairly present in all material respects the financial condition, results of operations and cash flows of the registrant as of, and for, the periods presented in this report;

 

4. The registrant’s other certifying officer(s) and I are responsible for establishing and maintaining disclosure controls and procedures (as defined in Exchange Act Rules 13a-15(e) and 15d-15(e)) and internal control over financial reporting (as defined in Exchange Act Rules 13a-15(f) and 15-d-15(f)) for the registrant and have:

 

a. Designed such disclosure controls and procedures, or caused such disclosure controls and procedures to be designed under our supervision, to ensure that material information relating to the registrant, is made known to us by others within those entities, particularly during the period in which this report is being prepared;

 

b. Designed such internal control over financial reporting, or caused such internal control over financial reporting to be designed under our supervision, to provide reasonable assurance regarding the reliability of financial reporting and the preparation of financial statements for external purposes in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles;

 

c. Evaluated the effectiveness of the registrant’s disclosure controls and procedures and presented in this report our conclusions about the effectiveness of the disclosure controls and procedures, as of the end of the period covered by this report based on such evaluation; and

 

d. Disclosed in this report any change in the registrant’s internal control over financial reporting that occurred during the registrant’s most recent fiscal quarter (the registrant’s fourth fiscal quarter in the case of an annual report) that has materially affected, or is reasonably likely to materially affect, the registrant’s internal control over financial reporting; and

 

5. The registrant’s other certifying officer and I have disclosed, based on our most recent evaluation of internal control over financial reporting, to the registrant’s auditors and the Audit Committee of the registrant’s board of directors (or persons performing the equivalent functions):

 

a. All significant deficiencies and material weaknesses in the design or operation of internal control over financial reporting which are reasonably likely to adversely affect the registrant’s ability to record, process, summarize and report financial information; and

 

b. Any fraud, whether or not material, that involves management or other employees who have a significant role in the registrant’s internal control over financial reporting.

 

Date: August 17, 2016  
   
/s/ Darwin Fogt  
Darwin Fogt,  
Chief Executive Officer (Principal Executive Officer)  

 

 
 

 

 

EXHIBIT 31.2

 

Exhibit 31.2 Certification of the Chief Financial Officer of eWellness Healthcare Corporation, pursuant to Section 302 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002

 

I, David Markowski, certify that:

 

1. I have reviewed this Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q for the quarterly period ended June 30, 2016 of eWellness Healthcare Corporation (the “registrant”);

 

2. Based on my knowledge, this report does not contain any untrue statement of a material fact or omit to state a material fact necessary to make the statements made, in light of the circumstances made, not misleading with respect to the period covered by this report;

 

3. Based on my knowledge, the financial statements, and other financial information included in this report, fairly present in all material respects the financial condition, results of operations and cash flows of the registrant as of, and for, the periods presented in this report;

 

4. The registrant’s other certifying officer(s) and I are responsible for establishing and maintaining disclosure controls and procedures (as defined in Exchange Act Rules 13a-15(e) and 15d-15(e)) and internal control over financial reporting (as defined in Exchange Act Rules 13a-15(f) and 15-d-15(f)) for the registrant and have:

 

a. Designed such disclosure controls and procedures, or caused such disclosure controls and procedures to be designed under our supervision, to ensure that material information relating to the registrant, is made known to us by others within those entities, particularly during the period in which this report is being prepared;

 

b. Designed such internal control over financial reporting, or caused such internal control over financial reporting to be designed under our supervision, to provide reasonable assurance regarding the reliability of financial reporting and the preparation of financial statements for external purposes in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles;

 

c. Evaluated the effectiveness of the registrant’s disclosure controls and procedures and presented in this report our conclusions about the effectiveness of the disclosure controls and procedures, as of the end of the period covered by this report based on such evaluation; and

 

d. Disclosed in this report any change in the registrant’s internal control over financial reporting that occurred during the registrant’s most recent fiscal quarter (the registrant’s fourth fiscal quarter in the case of an annual report) that has materially affected, or is reasonably likely to materially affect, the registrant’s internal control over financial reporting; and

 

5. The registrant’s other certifying officer and I have disclosed, based on our most recent evaluation of internal control over financial reporting, to the registrant’s auditors and the Audit Committee of the registrant’s board of directors (or persons performing the equivalent functions):

 

a. All significant deficiencies and material weaknesses in the design or operation of internal control over financial reporting which are reasonably likely to adversely affect the registrant’s ability to record, process, summarize and report financial information; and

 

b. Any fraud, whether or not material, that involves management or other employees who have a significant role in the registrant’s internal control over financial reporting.

 

Date: August 17, 2016  
   
/s/ David Markowski  
David Markowski,  
Chief Financial Officer  
(Principal Financial and Accounting Officer)  

 

 
 

 

 

EXHIBIT 32.1

 

Exhibit 32.1 Certification of the Chief Executive Officer of eWellness Healthcare Corporation pursuant to Section 906 of the Sarbanes Oxley Act of 2002

 

CERTIFICATION PURSUANT TO

18 U.S.C. SECTION 1350

AS ADOPTED PURSUANT TO

SECTION 906 OF THE SARBANES-OXLEY ACT OF 2002

 

In connection with the Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q of eWellness Healthcare Corporation (the “Company”) for the quarterly period ended June 30, 2016 as filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission (the “Report”), the undersigned Darwin Fogt, Chief Executive Officer of the Company certifies, pursuant to 18 U.S.C. Section 1350, as adopted pursuant to Section 906 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002, that to the best of my knowledge:

 

(1) the Report fully complies with the requirements of Section 13(a) or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934; and

 

(2) the information contained in the Report fairly presents, in all material respects, the financial condition and results of operations of the Company.

 

  eWellness Healthcare Corporation.
     
Date: August 17, 2016 By: /s/ Darwin Fogt
    Darwin Fogt, Director and Chief Executive Officer
    (Principal Executive Officer)

 

This certification accompanies this Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q pursuant to Section 906 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 and shall not, except to the extent required by such Act, be deemed filed by the Company for purposes of Section 18 of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended (the “Exchange Act”). Such certification will not be deemed to be incorporated by reference into any filing under the Securities Act of 1933, as amended, or the Exchange Act, except to the extent that the Company specifically incorporates it by reference.

 

 
 

 

 

EXHIBIT 32.2

 

Exhibit 32.2 Certification of the Chief Financial Officer of eWellness Healthcare Corporation pursuant to Section 906 of the Sarbanes Oxley Act of 2002

 

CERTIFICATION PURSUANT TO

18 U.S.C. SECTION 1350

AS ADOPTED PURSUANT TO

SECTION 906 OF THE SARBANES-OXLEY ACT OF 2002

 

In connection with the Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q of eWellness Healthcare Corporation (the “Company”) for the quarterly period ended June 30, 2016 as filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission (the “Report”), the undersigned David Markowski, Chief Financial Officer of the Company, certifies, pursuant to 18 U.S.C. Section 1350, as adopted pursuant to Section 906 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002, that to the best of my knowledge:

 

(1) the Report fully complies with the requirements of Section 13(a) or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934; and

 

(2) the information contained in the Report fairly presents, in all material respects, the financial condition and results of operations of the Company.

 

  eWellness Healthcare Corporation
   
Date: August 17, 2016 /s/ David Markowski
  David Markowski, Chief Financial Officer
  (Principal Financial and Accounting Officer)

 

This certification accompanies this Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q pursuant to Section 906 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 and shall not, except to the extent required by such Act, be deemed filed by the Company for purposes of Section 18 of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended (the “Exchange Act”). Such certification will not be deemed to be incorporated by reference into any filing under the Securities Act of 1933, as amended, or the Exchange Act, except to the extent that the Company specifically incorporates it by reference.